The Goal of Lent

It is the season of Lent. But why all the long faces? Doesn’t the story of the Christian Scriptures begin with good news (creation) and end with even better news (new creation and a wedding feast)? “Yes, but,” as someone will no doubt remind me, “the story also entails the fall of our race, and the disordering of all of our affections, so that we love (and fear and desire) what is not fitting. That’s why we practice disciplines like fasting, almost like the ancient Stoics, so we can seek a more virtuous life.” All of this is true, I believe, and the Stoics deserve our admiration and study. (“All truth is God’s,” as Justin the Martyr and Thomas Aquinas said.) But are the foundational stories of Stoics and Christians really the same? Stoics view the world as a place of hard law and fate where history offers nothing beyond a cyclical stage upon which to practice heroic courage and self-discipline. On such a stage, the disciplines may be an end in themselves. But in the Christian story, the goal of the disciplines looks beyond such athletic achievements to the creation of a new community, tempered by self-sacrificing love. In that world, as the ancient monastics knew, the disciplines are not an end in themselves. Indeed they must be set aside if they interfere with caring for the needs of our neighbor. It may also be well to consider, as we think about our own goals for Lent, that heroes are sometimes a real handful for others to live with.

The art work in this post is titled “Mahonia Morning,” and is in a private collection. More information about this painting and others can be found in the galleries of my art work at Fine Art America.

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Who will save Narnia at the movies?

For several years now the wonders of hollywood and computer-graphics have been harnessed with remarkable creativity to bring C. S. Lewis’s Narnia Tales to the world of the popular theater. A worthy undertaking! I wish yet wonder if we shall ever see a new episode. There is, however, and in my opinion, a problem. With each production in the series the movies have gotten farther and farther afield from the true spirit and wisdom of C. S. Lewis’s original stories. Lewis was a remarkable apologist for an orthodox Christian view of the world, what is wrong with it (us) and how it (we) can be set right. But the theatrical adaptations of Lewis’s fantasy world of Narnia have increasingly avoided the more difficult and incisive insights of their source both in Lewis and in his biblical and Christian sources. This became especially clear with the recent production by Walden Media of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. If you would like to read an indepth article on this subject, with insights drawn from Lewis’s other writings, see my article on Narnia at the Movies

An Opening Invitation

Welcome to my forum for discussions of faith and the arts. I am an artist (watercolorist, musician, writer) and a theologian (Christian), and I am interested in the relevance of each of these “fields” for each other, and for the expression and exploration of the Christian faith as expressed in its classical and biblical sources.  In coming days I plan to post a variety of articles on the far-reaching and wide-ranging implications of this subject. I hope you will let me know if any of these thoughts are helpful to you, or if you have suggestions for how to explore a topic with better insight. I welcome your comments and responses. For now I must get used to working in WordPress. See you soon, I hope!

The art work included in this post is titled, “Past and Present.” The subject is a group of Iris blossoms that grow in the cemetery at Glen Cove, Texas, where many members of my family are buried. For more information on this and other of my art works see my galleries at Fine Art America.